B.A.S.S. DIVISION
Division Profile

The Division's mandate is to provide a CSPG forum for members who are interested in seeing the "wood" when they are looking at the "trees". Most of us deal with small areas in our daily work. A good understanding of the big geologic picture in which our areas are located will facilitate better geological interpretations and predictions, which will translate into higher drilling success rates. The aim of the Basin Analysis and Sequence Stratigraphy Division is to be innovative, inspiring and practical. We will try to introduce new concepts and methodologies of basin analysis and sequence stratigraphy to our group. We would also like to share inspiring interpretations of historical Canadian data. In particular, we encourage speakers to offer learnings that we can take home and apply in our daily work. The Division is also interested in running field trips or joint talks with other Divisions in the future.

Upcoming Division Talk
Integrated approach to understand which reservoir characteristics lead to better Montney productivity

Jean-Yves Chatellier 
12:00 Noon Wednesday, February 15th, 2017
geoLOGIC Classroom (2nd Floor), Aquitaine Tower, 540-5th Avenue S.W., Calgary

ABSTRACT
The unconventional Montney play is extensive in area as well as in thickness and offers a large range of facies and associated properties. Identification of the best targets and the optimal frac design will rest on understanding the variability in rock properties such as brittleness and pore throat size, the nature of the hydrocarbon in place and the maturity level of the various Montney intervals. Combining inorganic and organic geochemistry with geomechanics and other rock properties can be simple and economically very rewarding.

Published XRD based brittleness formulas have so far fail to address the problem of type and distribution of calcite which can make the rock more brittle (higher Young’s Modulus with increased carbonate cement) or ductile (higher Poisson’s ratio when carbonate pelecypod rich); XRF can directly distinguish between these two types in the Montney using Ca-Mn ratios. Similarly while quartz content may increase brittleness, quartz cement impairs fraccability and can be easily estimated using Si-Zr ratios. Additionally, petrophysics based brittleness has been successfully cross-correlated to single or multi XRF elements, giving tools to better design frac stages in Montney horizontal wells.

Small pore throat size may leave hydrocarbon left behind within the reservoir. A new integrated approach will be discussed that invokes comparing gas composition from chromatography with blended cutting gas. The derived pore throat sizes have been calibrated against the ones based on capillary pressure curves using a new 30% Hg based formula. 

Last but not least, is the importance of the maturity level and the distinction between in-situ gas and migrated gas within various part of the Montney sequence. Text book examples of shale dehydration within the Montney will be shown in the in-situ dry gas domain using a very large data set of flow back water geochemistry; all this with the associated potential for soaking/marinating these reservoirs and dramatically improving productivity.

BIOGRAPHY
Jean-Yves Chatellier has been working for large oil companies for thirty years and has been focusing on North American shale and tight sand reservoirs for the past nine years. He has published extensively on structural geology, sedimentology, geochemistry and reservoir engineering. He is presently co-chair of the AAPG Research Committee and very active in other societies (CSPG, SPE). He is presently initiating and managing two separate consortia dealing with Montney and Duvernay organic and inorganic geochemistry to optimize frac design.

Past Presentations

April 27th, 2016
Sequence Stratigraphic Analysis of Mixed,
Reefal 
Carbonate and Siliciclastic Systems
Ashton Embry
Download Slides (.PDF) 
March 11th, 2015
Geological Risk
Kirk Osadetz
Download Slides (.PDF) 
March 14th, 2014
The Future of Gas Hyrdates as a Fuel 
Kirk Osadetz 
Download Slides (.PDF)  


 February 11th, 2014

Alberta Hydrocarbon - Bearing Shales & Siltstones
Steve Lyster & Dean Rokosh
Download Slides (.PDF)
 
Division Information

Our meeting schedule is to have at least one informal brown-bag talk every month, except during the summer. Talks normally start at 12:00 noon and finish before 1:00 p.m. Each talk consists of a 40 minute technical presentation followed by a 10 minute question period. 

Involvement of our CSPG members is the key to the success of the Division. Individuals are encouraged to take part in all activities. Service companies are also encouraged to attend Division meetings and be involved in all Division activities.

Basin Analysis and Sequence Stratigraphy Technical Division Talks are free. Please bring your lunch. For further information about the division, joining our mailing list, a list of upcoming talks, or if you wish to present a talk or lead a field trip, please contact either Steve Donaldson at (403) 808-8641 or Mark Caplan at (403) 975-7701. 

Talk space generously provided by: 

March 14th, 2014
The Future of Gas Hyrdates as a Fuel
Krik Osadetz
February 11th, 2014
Alberta Hydrocarbon - Bearing Shales & Siltstones
Steve Lyster & Dean Rokosh
Tal