HEAVY OIL/OIL SANDS

Division Profile
The Heavy Oil / Oil Sands Division was originally established in November 2007. The purpose of the division was to provide a forum for CSPG members and guests who are either employed and/or interested in learning more about the disciplines of heavy oil and oil sands. This division is focused on providing attendees the opportunity to learn more about the geology, technology, various projects and development in the heavy oil / oil sands industry. In addition, this forum will provide the attendee the chance to network with their peers and meet new contacts in the industry.

Division Information

The division will host a breakfast session that will take place in the Halliburton Training Room which is located at Room 1830, 645 - 7th Avenue SW.  The forum will start at 8:00am and starts with a 10 minute introduction, followed by a 40 minute talk, and will conclude with 10 minutes to network. We are looking for sponsors for our continental breakfast. The sponsor will get promoted on our group email as well as at the event. During the introduction each sponsor will be able to talk for up to 5 minutes about their company, services and products. The sponsoring company will also be able to provide a business card draw.

The monthly forum will be the first Wednesday of each month. We expect to host additional events throughout the year to allow our attendees the opportunity to do more networking. Some of these events include a Christmas party and Stampede party. The events will be complimentary and will be sponsored by various service companies engaged in the heavy oil / oil sands industry.

If you are interested in becoming a volunteer, giving a presentation, sponsoring an events, or joining our mailing list, please contact of one volunteers or chairperson.

Chair: Randy Smith, geotrakker@shaw.ca, (c) 403.968.9222

Upcoming Division Talk


Field Trip: Wednesday June 7th, 2017 

Bus leaves at 8am and returns by 8pm | registration fee: $100 (cost has been subsidized by sponsors)
To reserve your spot and for more travel details email ostalks@shaw.ca by Friday May 18th. Space is limited! 

Modern and Ancient Point Bar Sediments as Analogues for Subsurface Reservoirs in NE Alberta

Jason Lavigne (CNRL), Dr. Paul Durkin (University of Calgary) and Dr. Michael Webb (Suncor)

This one day Field Trip will take place on Wednesday, June 7th, 2017.
We will start by examining the modern Red Deer River and look how the modern channel is entrenched into its floodplain. There will be a discussion of terrace stratigraphy within valley fill deposits which can be interpreted to explain some of the reservoir heterogeneity near the base of several insitu development projects in the McMurray Formation in the Athabasca Basin. 
We will spend the majority of the field trip in and around Willow Creek looking at ancient point bar deposits. We discuss various stratigraphic interpretations of the position of several channel-fill units within a meander belt at the top of the basal deltaic cycle of the Horseshoe Canyon Formation. This is an excellent locality to discuss development scenarios in the context of well placement and facies variability in heterolithic reservoirs. 
The philosophy behind the field trip is to bring geoscientists together to have a friendly, open discussion about geology that is relevant to, (but not exactly analogous to) subsurface reservoirs, particularly in the Oil Sands of NE Alberta. The leaders will act to facilitate discussion, but it is hoped that knowledge sharing from all participants contributes to the enjoyment of the day. We will end the trip at the historic Last Change Saloon in Wayne, Alberta for steak and beverages.

Field Trip Leaders
Jason Lavigne has a BSc. from the University of New Brunswick and a MSc. from the University of Alberta. He has 20 years’ experience working as a sedimentologist and stratigrapher on a wide variety of domestic and international projects. He is currently a District Geologist at Canadian Natural Resources, working on oil sands reservoirs in the McMurray, Wabiskaw and Clearwater formations.
Dr. Michael Webb is the Principal Geoscience Advisor for Suncor Energy’s in situ thermal business, where he works with the geoscience staff on training and development, technical excellence, and special projects.  Michael received his first two degrees from the University of Alberta, and his PhD from the University of Wyoming, where he studied fluvial systems of the Lance Formation in the Bighorn Basin.

Dr. Paul Durkin completed his B.Sc. at McMaster University, before moving to the University of Calgary to undertake a Ph.D. with Dr. Stephen Hubbard. His thesis focused on fluvial meander-belt processes, including point bar evolution, sedimentology and stratigraphic architecture, and geocellular modelling. Paul is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Calgary, and has recently accepted a position as an Assistant Professor in Geological Sciences at the University of Manitoba starting in January 2018
 
Predicting heterogeneity in fluvial and tidal-fluvial meander-belt deposits: The point bar to counter point bar transition
Speaker: Paul R. Durkin | University of Calgary 

Location: Halliburton Training Centre (Room 1830, 645 – 7th Ave SW)
Date/Time: Monday June 12th @ 8:00am


ABSTRACT 
Meander-belt deposits are inherently complex in terms of stratigraphic architecture and sediment distribution. Recent research on counter-point bar deposits specifically, has highlighted their potentially significant differences in reservoir quality compared to adjacent point bar deposits. However, recognition criteria and characteristics of counter-point bars in the ancient rock record are still relatively under-reported. In order to improve subsurface predictions of meander-belt lithofacies, we document a series of modern point bar to counter-point bar transitions from a range of fluvial to tidal-fluvial environments. A series of vibracore and sediment samples were collected along point bar to counter point bar transitions on the Willapa, Chehalis and Peace Rivers, from Washington State and Alberta. Results document a significant decrease in net-to-gross from the upstream convex point bar, to the downstream counter point bar. The transition is congruent with an inflection point in meander bend morphology from convex point bar to concave counter-point bar. We compare modern examples studied to a variety of subsurface and outcrop point bar to counter point bar transitions from the Alberta Foreland basin, including the Cretaceous McMurray and Grand Rapids formations. We find that the changes documented in modern meandering channels are consistent with ancient examples, and reservoir quality of IHS- and siltstone-dominated counter-point bar deposits are significantly poorer than adjacent sandstone-dominated point bar deposits. Impact on reservoir performance and steam chamber development within stacked meander-belt successions is also considered.
 
BIOGRAPHY 
Dr. Paul Durkin completed his B.Sc. at McMaster University, before moving to the University of Calgary to undertake a Ph.D. with Dr. Stephen Hubbard. His thesis focused on fluvial meander-belt processes, including point bar evolution, sedimentology and stratigraphic architecture, and geocellular modelling. Paul is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Calgary, and has recently accepted a position as an Assistant Professor in Geological Sciences at the University of Manitoba starting in January 2018. 




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